The Book!

The Definitive book on Gene Krupa’s equipment history

GK

Book Ammendments:
Some recent ‘discoveries’ in the ongoing quest for more and better information to add to the book are an essential part of the overall “picture” of Gene’s equipment history.
On page 200 of GK is a description of a pair of the early Krupa model sticks (Gene is shown actually using in 1936-’37) that were acquired by collector/drum historian, Shawn Martin. Shawn’s pair were the first and only pair this author had ever seen that matched photos of what Gene was using, as of the mid ’30’s. The placement of the (black) stamped lettering was unlike the stick models that Gene used slightly later. Instead of all info being included on a single line at the butt end of the sticks, Shawn’s pair was split into two separate lines. One line said, “SLINGERLAND” and the other said, “GENE KRUPA MODEL”. By the end of the ’30’s, all wording was on one single line.
Being a fairly pivotal discovery, it neatly answered a number of questions but, as usual, generated twice as many more. Sadly, the specific ‘history’ of the sticks was unknown. It remains as such (so far) but a more recent discovery/acquisition by the author himself further expands the whole subject.
February ’21 was when this author came across another pair of sticks (like Shawn’s) but for one interesting difference. The lettering was RED, not black! The two-line layout was identical. The font on the red lettering is also slightly different as it was Sans-serif.

NEXT…Book contributor/photographer Paul Testa came across this photo to, once and for all, put to rest the mystery of whether Gene ever used white handled brushes as mentioned on page 204 of GK. The answer, indeed he did for a short period of time in the mid to late ’60’s.



Update on the book…
After reaching a decent ‘stopping point’ with writing and research on GK it was time to get serious about more extensive efforts on publishing it. One thing that had been a long-standing problem with what had taken years to build was the quality of the software used. It just was not all that great. I could no longer accept its results as satisfactory. Hence, after some conversations with a few friends who are “pros” in the publishing and commercial graphics biz, I took the plunge into a crash course on using the ‘grown-up’ software that they use every day. What a tremendous improvement it was! It has taken a solid month and a half (every day and night) to make the transfer to higher quality but the results have been most pleasing! (one can actually READ tiny images of catalog pages, etc.!)
I now need to acquire decent Index-making software and a few tweaks to content. Once done with that, a PRINT version will be ready to launch!
Do stay tuned!

%d bloggers like this: